Content about Washington University

February 13, 2014

New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that people who struggle with mood problems or addiction can safely quit smoking and that kicking the habit is associated with improved mental health, the university announced earlier this week.

ST. LOUIS — New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that people who struggle with mood problems or addiction can safely quit smoking and that kicking the habit is associated with improved mental health, the university announced earlier this week. 

June 14, 2013

States that want to reduce rates of adult smoking may consider implementing stringent tobacco restrictions on teens, suggested a new study released by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis on Thursday.

ST. LOUIS — States that want to reduce rates of adult smoking may consider implementing stringent tobacco restrictions on teens, suggested a new study released by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis on Thursday.

The researchers discovered that states with more restrictive limits on teens purchasing tobacco also have lower adult smoking rates, especially among women. And compared with states with less restrictive limits, they also tend to have fewer adult heavy smokers.

November 14, 2012

People with diabetes often develop clogged arteries that cause heart disease, and new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that low vitamin D levels are to blame.

ST. LOUIS — People with diabetes often develop clogged arteries that cause heart disease, and new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that low vitamin D levels are to blame. In a study published Nov. 9 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the researchers reported that blood vessels are less like to clog in people with diabetes who get adequate vitamin D. But in patients with insufficient vitamin D, immune cells bind to blood vessels near the heart, then trap cholesterol to block those blood vessels.

November 24, 2010

Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the early 1980s, one of the greatest advances has been antiviral drugs that have helped extend the lives of patients with viral infections.

ST. LOUIS — Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the early 1980s, one of the greatest advances has been antiviral drugs that have helped extend the lives of patients with viral infections.