Content about Viread

January 15, 2013

While replacing a single combination pill for HIV with generics would save the healthcare system money, it could also diminish the effectiveness of treatment, a new study suggests.

NEW YORK — While replacing a single combination pill for HIV with generics would save the healthcare system money, it could also diminish the effectiveness of treatment, a new study suggests.

The study, led by investigators at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Weill Cornell Medical College, and published in the Jan. 15 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine, found $1 billion in potential savings, but the more complicated treatment regimen might result in more patients missing doses and a loss of drug effectiveness.

July 13, 2011

Taking drugs for treating HIV might reduce the risk of infection among heterosexual couples, according to two new studies conducted in Africa.

NEW YORK — Taking drugs for treating HIV might reduce the risk of infection among heterosexual couples, according to two new studies conducted in Africa.

One study, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and conducted among 4,758 couples in Kenya and Uganda, found that when taken daily, Gilead’s Viread (tenofovir) reduced the rates of infection by at least 62% compared with placebo. Truvada (tenofovir and emtricitabine), another drug made by Gilead, reduced infection risk by 73%.