Content about Truvada

July 16, 2012

The Food and Drug Administration has approved a drug used to treat HIV for reducing the risk of HIV infection, the agency said Monday.

SILVER SPRING, Md. — The Food and Drug Administration has approved a drug used to treat HIV for reducing the risk of HIV infection, the agency said Monday.

May 11, 2012

An expert panel at the Food and Drug Administration has recommended that the agency approve a drug made by Gilead Sciences for lowering the risk of infection by the virus that causes AIDS.

FOSTER CITY, Calif. — An expert panel at the Food and Drug Administration has recommended that the agency approve a drug made by Gilead Sciences for lowering the risk of infection by the virus that causes AIDS.

May 9, 2012

The Food and Drug Administration may be close to approving a drug for preventing HIV infection, according to published reports.

NEW YORK — The Food and Drug Administration may be close to approving a drug for preventing HIV infection, according to published reports.

The Associated Press reported that the FDA had said Truvada (emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate), made by Gilead Sciences, appeared to be safe and effective for preventing HIV infection when taken daily. An FDA advisory committee will review the drug and decide whether to recommend its approval for pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP.

February 14, 2012

The Food and Drug Administration is giving priority review to a drug made by Gilead Sciences that the company is investigating for the prevention of HIV.

FOSTER CITY, Calif. — The Food and Drug Administration is giving priority review to a drug made by Gilead Sciences that the company is investigating for the prevention of HIV.

Gilead said the FDA gave the special designation to its application for Truvada (emtricitabine and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate) for pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, to reduce the risk of HIV infection. The FDA originally approved Truvada for treating HIV infection in 2004, and it is currently the most prescribed antiretroviral drug in the United States.

July 13, 2011

Taking drugs for treating HIV might reduce the risk of infection among heterosexual couples, according to two new studies conducted in Africa.

NEW YORK — Taking drugs for treating HIV might reduce the risk of infection among heterosexual couples, according to two new studies conducted in Africa.

One study, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and conducted among 4,758 couples in Kenya and Uganda, found that when taken daily, Gilead’s Viread (tenofovir) reduced the rates of infection by at least 62% compared with placebo. Truvada (tenofovir and emtricitabine), another drug made by Gilead, reduced infection risk by 73%.

June 30, 2011

A group of physicians is urging the Food and Drug Administration not to approve a drug made by Gilead Sciences for the prevention of HIV infection.

LOS ANGELES — A group of physicians is urging the Food and Drug Administration not to approve a drug made by Gilead Sciences for the prevention of HIV infection.

Fifty-five physicians signed a letter spearheaded by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation citing concerns about the use of Gilead’s Truvada (tenofovir disoproxil fumarate and emtricitabine) for “pre-exposure prophylaxis,” or PrEP. Concerns included the risk of a decrease in condom use and a lack of information showing proper use in “real world” situations.