Content about Subcutaneous injection

April 24, 2014

Endo International announced that its affiliates have acquired rights to Sumavel DosePro (sumatriptan injection) for subcutaneous use from Zogenix.

DUBLIN — Endo International announced that its affiliates have acquired rights to Sumavel DosePro (sumatriptan injection) for subcutaneous use from Zogenix. The product is a needle-free delivery system for sumatriptan. Sumavel DosePro is used to treat adults who have been diagnosed with acute migraine or cluster headaches.

April 15, 2014

The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday announced that it approved Tanzeum (albiglutide) subcutaneous injection, which is used to improve glycemic control in adults with Type 2 diabetes.

SILVER SPRING, Md. — The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday announced that it has approved Tanzeum (albiglutide) subcutaneous injection, which is used to improve glycemic control in adults with Type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes affects approximately 24 million people and accounts for more than 90% of diabetes cases diagnosed in the United States.

May 22, 2012

Medical supply manufacturer BD has released a syringe with a shorter needle designed to reduce discomfort in patients with diabetes who must inject insulin, the company said Tuesday.

FRANKLIN LAKES, N.J. — Medical supply manufacturer BD has released a syringe with a shorter needle designed to reduce discomfort in patients with diabetes who must inject insulin, the company said Tuesday.

BD announced the introduction of the ultra-fine 6mm needle, saying more than 80% of patients expressed a preference for it in trials, and a recent article published by the American Association of Diabetes Educators recognized the safety and efficacy of shorter needles.

The needle is designed to deliver insulin subcutaneously in adults and children.

March 28, 2011

A study published online in the journal Diabetes Care, and slated for the April print issue, suggested that counting carbohydrates could lead to an improvement in quality of life and a reduction in body mass index and waist circumference in patients with Type 1 diabetes who receive continuous subcutaneous insulin infusions.

NEW YORK — A study published online in the journal Diabetes Care, and slated for the April print issue, suggested that counting carbohydrates could lead to an improvement in quality of life and a reduction in body mass index and waist circumference in patients with Type 1 diabetes who receive continuous subcutaneous insulin infusions.