Content about Privacy

October 28, 2013

A growing number of consumers are concerned about their privacy when they sign up for loyalty card programs, according to a new survey.

CHICAGO — A growing number of consumers are concerned about their privacy when they sign up for loyalty card programs, according to a new survey.

Market research firm Mintel found that 32% of Americans believe the privacy of their personal information is an important attribute of a loyalty program, and one-tenth or more express frustration or dissatisfaction with too much personal information being requested during enrollment and lack of control over the privacy of their information. The report was based on a survey of 2,000 adults.

July 18, 2013

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, commonly known as HIPAA, has been in effect for a decade. In the last law column, we looked at how the HIPAA privacy rule has been enforced; in this column we provide some tips for avoiding HIPAA violations.

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, commonly known as HIPAA, has been in effect for a decade. In the last law column, we looked at how the HIPAA privacy rule has been enforced; in this column we provide some tips for avoiding HIPAA violations.

First, it’s essential to understand what is being protected by HIPAA. The privacy rule applies to protected health information, or PHI, which the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services defines as “information, including demographic data, that relates to:

June 7, 2013

In April 2003, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS, Office for Civil Rights, or OCR, began enforcing the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, commonly known as HIPAA. Now, a decade later, we can look at how the rule is being applied.

In April 2003, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or HHS, Office for Civil Rights, or OCR, began enforcing the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, commonly known as HIPAA. Now, a decade later, we can look at how the rule is being applied.

Facts and figures

March 28, 2013

The Department of Health and Human Services issued a new rule that it said was necessary to protect the security of health information stored online.

NEW YORK — The Department of Health and Human Services issued a new rule that it said was necessary to protect the security of health information stored online.

As required by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act, which was part of the 2009 economic stimulus bill, HHS said it would change patient privacy rules in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act in order to provide for privacy and security protection for information stored in electronic health records.

June 5, 2012

A coalition of more than 22,000 pharmacies around the country has appointed a new VP and chief privacy officer.

LEESBURG, Va. — A coalition of more than 22,000 pharmacies around the country has appointed a new VP and chief privacy officer.

RxAlly announced Tuesday the appointment of Peter Duran to the position, in which he'll be responsible for the ensuring that the group's privacy practices comply with laws and regulations.

Duran previously worked for pharmacy benefit manager Medco Health Solutions for 15 years, where he helped build the company's privacy program.

March 2, 2012

Two bills designed to protect "covered critical infrastructure" against cyber attacks by terrorists and others should remain focused on their key purpose and not be expanded to include data breach legislation or broad new privacy regimes, the National Retail Federation said.

WASHINGTON — Two bills designed to protect "covered critical infrastructure" against cyber attacks by terrorists and others should remain focused on their key purpose and not be expanded to include data breach legislation or broad new privacy regimes, the National Retail Federation said.

April 22, 2011

A company that makes tracking technology for retailers and drug companies is making an initial public offering.

SEATTLE — A company that makes tracking technology for retailers and drug companies is making an initial public offering.

Seattle-based Impinj, which makes ultra-high-frequency radio-frequency identification tags, made the announcement Thursday, saying it had filed a registration statement with the Securities and Exchange Commission relating to a proposed IPO.

Impinj’s tags, which are cheaper and smaller than regular RFID tags, are used by retailers to track inventory and by drug companies to keep counterfeit drugs out of the supply chain.