Content about Pale ale

July 30, 2012

Acadia Ales has launched its Sky High Rye, a West Coast-style pale ale, in 12-oz. cans from Rexam.

CHICAGO — Acadia Ales has launched its Sky High Rye, a West Coast-style pale ale, in 12-oz. cans from Rexam.

Sky High Rye, brewed with 80% English barley malt and 20% rye malt, was launched in Rexam aluminum cans because of their portability and accessibility, the company said, adding that "consumers will no longer be limited by the restrictions of a glass container, which ultimately makes Sky High Rye more accessible to [our] loyal fans."

July 17, 2012

Craft beers, particularly India Pale Ales and seasonals, continue to drive category growth in the beer category.

Craft beers, particularly India Pale Ales and seasonals, continue to drive category growth in the beer category. A number of imported labels have seen an uptick in sales. Brands with a strong Hispanic appeal, such as Modelo Especial, Victoria and Corona, consistently have had strong sales. Stella Artois also has been a strong performer.

Meanwhile, major breweries are attempting to breathe life back into traditional brands with new introductions aimed at younger consumers.

  

January 4, 2012

Craft beers — particularly seasonals — have provided much-needed innovation to the beer category, providing the category with double-digit sales increases for the last several years.

Craft beers — particularly seasonals — have provided much-needed innovation to the beer category, providing the category with double-digit sales increases for the last several years. Craft brews’ sales were up 16.2% for the 52 weeks ended in early October 2011, according to the Brewers Association. While craft brews represent 4.9% of total beer category volume, the segments accounts for 7.6% of retail dollar volume.

February 28, 2011

Samuel Adams is sprucing up its Imperial lineup of beers with a new scotch-style ale.

BOSTON — Samuel Adams is sprucing up its Imperial lineup of beers with a new scotch-style ale.

New Samuel Adams Wee Heavy is inspired by the Scottish tradition of naming ales for their strength. The new ale weighs in at 10% alcohol by volume, twice that of the average beer. Samuel Adams suggests that the beer be enjoyed like a fine wine.