Content about Mass

March 13, 2014

Men and women with large waist circumferences — even those with a healthy body mass index — are more likely to die younger, and were more likely to die from such illnesses as heart disease, respiratory problems and cancer after accounting for BMI, smoking, alcohol use and physical activity, according to a study led by a Mayo Clinic researcher.

ROCHESTER, Minn.— Men and women with large waist circumferences — even those with a healthy body mass index — are more likely to die younger, and were more likely to die from such illnesses as heart disease, respiratory problems and cancer after accounting for BMI, smoking, alcohol use and physical activity, according to a study led by a Mayo Clinic researcher.

The study is published in the March edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

January 14, 2013

A new study indicates that body mass index is a reliable indicator of obesity-related health risks.

NEW YORK — A new study indicates body mass index is a reliable indicator of obesity-related health risks.

The study, published Saturday in the journal Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, compared the merits of BMI to other measures of body size as a predictor of obesity-related cardiovascular health risks. The study's authors noted that some have questioned the validity of BMI.