Content about Comcast

March 2, 2012

According to various surveys and articles on the topic, television networks love reality TV. After all, a reality TV show is cheaper — $100,000 to $500,000 per episode, according to some estimates — and simpler to produce than a show with a script, multiple sets and special effects. And to boot, it gets a lot of viewers. But regardless of their benefits to big media companies, reality TV shows also have a habit of influencing culture, which UnitedHealth Group and Comcast hope to use to their advantage.

WHAT IT MEANS AND WHY IT'S IMPORTANT — According to various surveys and articles on the topic, television networks love reality TV. After all, a reality TV show is cheaper — $100,000 to $500,000 per episode, according to some estimates — and simpler to produce than a show with a script, multiple sets and special effects. And to boot, it gets a lot of viewers.

March 1, 2012

UnitedHealth Group is looking to evaluate the effectiveness of using video-on-demand programming to deliver its Diabetes Prevention Program.

PHILADELPHIA — UnitedHealth Group is looking to evaluate the effectiveness of using video-on-demand programming to deliver its Diabetes Prevention Program.

The insurance company has tapped Comcast to find participants for the study, which will be test marketed in Philadelphia, and Knoxville, Tenn. Enrollment began on Feb. 13; the first VOD programming will be available Feb. 27.