Content about Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

October 30, 2013

Vaccination of adolescents against whooping cough appears to result in fewer hospitalizations, according to a new study.

CINCINNATI — Vaccination of adolescents against whooping cough appears to result in fewer hospitalizations, according to a new study.

The study, conducted by researchers at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and the University of Michigan and published in the journal Pediatrics, found that hospitalizations for whooping cough, also known as pertussis, were lower than would be expected if they had not been inoculated.

July 8, 2013

Reporting their results July 8 in Cancer Cell, researchers say their successful laboratory tests in human MDS cells and mouse models of MDS provide a molecular target for designing new drugs to battle a syndrome with few effective treatments.

CINCINNATI — The Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center announced today that scientists have successfully targeted a malfunctioning immune system enzyme to kill diseased cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome — a blood disorder and precursor to leukemia.

Reporting their results July 8 in Cancer Cell, researchers say their successful laboratory tests in human MDS cells and mouse models of MDS provide a molecular target for designing new drugs to battle a syndrome with few effective treatments.

May 10, 2013

Kids in child care are not meeting their daily nutritional needs with the snacks they tend to eat, according to a new study.

CINCINNATI — Kids in child care are not meeting their daily nutritional needs with the snacks they tend to eat, according to a new study.

October 21, 2011

More than 1-in-4 kindergarten children, and 1-in-5 teachers, had difficulty distinguishing between medicine and candy in new research conducted by two now seventh-grade students, who presented their findings earlier this week at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition here.

BOSTON — More than 1-in-4 kindergarten children, and 1-in-5 teachers, had difficulty distinguishing between medicine and candy in new research conducted by two now seventh-grade students, who presented their findings earlier this week at the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference and Exhibition here.

Casey Gittelman and Eleanor Bishop conducted their study, "Candy or Medicine: Can Children Tell the Difference?" earlier this year at Ayer Elementary School in suburban Cincinnati.