Study finds shifts in how consumers define wellness

NEW YORK — More than half of consumers have recently changed their views on health and wellness and added more vitamin D to their diets, while nearly a third have consumed functional beverages in the last 30 days, according to a new survey.

The Hartman Group, a Bellevue, Wash.-based consumer market research company, announced the release of its Health & Wellness Lifestyles 2013 study, which looks at the contemporary health and wellness landscape and how consumers have changed and trends that could shape the future.

In particular, the study found slight shifts in how people define wellness and how they tie it to states of being like feeling good about oneself, physical fitness, not being ill, ability to deal with stress and healthy weight. For example, in 2005, 60% identified "not being overweight" as being a part of wellness, a figure that grew to 66% by 2010. Similarly, "not being ill" was tied with wellness 69% of the time in 2005, rising to 75% in 2007 and falling again to 67% in 2010. Sixty-one percent of consumers defined wellness by their ability to deal with stress in 2005, compared with 68% in 2008 and 67% in 2010. Smaller changes were found in those who identified "being physically fit" and "feeling good about myself."